CHCF poll: 76% of frontline employees at SNFs report COVID infections among staff

Results from a California Health Care Foundation (CHCF) poll released Friday morning finds 76% of frontline employees at California skilled nursing facilities say they have had known or suspected COVID-19 cases among staff at the facilities. Sixty percent of those surveyed report cases among residents.

The survey was conducted in June and July and gathered responses from 353 skilled nursing facility (SNF) employees, including 285 certified nurse assistants.

 

 

The numbers of known or suspected cases among staff and residents were higher for SNFs in LA County. There, 89% of respondents report known or suspected cases among staff (compared to 69% elsewhere) and 76% report infections among facility residents (50% outside of LA County).

Data from the poll also reflects the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Black and Latino individuals.  In facilities where the majority of residents are Black or Latino, 66% of survey respondents report COVID cases among residents. In other facilities, 50% of respondents report cases among residents.

“Frontline health workers in nursing homes are reporting disturbingly high numbers of COVID-19 cases among the staff of these facilities,” said Kristof Stremikis, director of market analysis and insight at the California Health Care Foundation. “The trend is even worse in Los Angeles County, which has experienced a noticeable spike in cases, as well as in facilities that serve higher percentages of Black and Latino residents.”

Poll results also reveal 93% are worried about contracting COVID while working. This includes 51% reporting they are “extremely concerned,” 28% are “very concerned, and 14% are “somewhat concerned.”

Seventy-seven percent report they believe their facilities have adequate personal protective equipment, while 23% say they do not.

Nearly three-fourths of these frontline workers report they are either “very confident” or “somewhat confident” in their facility’s ability to respond to current or future infections.

 

Image: California Health Care Foundation