Suicide rates increase in nearly every state

A report by the CDC shows that suicide rates increased in every state except for Nevada from 1999 through 2016.

Half of the states saw suicide rates increase by more than 30 percent during this time frame.

North Dakota saw the highest increase of 57.6 percent. Delaware had the lowest increase of 5.9 percent. Nevada saw a 1 percent decrease, the only state with a reduction of its suicide rate.

 

 

Surprisingly, 54 percent of people who died by suicide did not have a known mental health condition. People who die by suicide are more likely to be male and to die by firearm, regardless if there is a known mental health condition.

In 2016, nearly 45,000 people died by suicide in the United States.

StatePercent Change
1999-2016
2016 Suicide Rate
National25.415.4
Alabama21.917.5
Alaska37.428.8
Arizona17.320.9
Arkansas36.821.2
California14.812.1
Colorado34.123.2
Conneticut19.211.5
Delaware5.914.4
District of Columbia16.16.9
Florida10.616.4
Georgia16.215
Hawaii18.315.2
Idaho43.224.7
Illinois22.812.2
Indiana31.917.1
Iowa36.216
Kansas4519.4
Kentucky36.619.3
Louisiana29.317
Maine27.418.5
Maryland8.510.8
Massachusetts35.310
Michigan32.915.6
Minnesota40.615
Mississippi17.815.2
Missouri36.420
Montana3829.2
Nebraska16.214.8
Nevada-123.1
New Hampshire48.320
New Jersey19.29.2
New Mexico18.326
New York28.89.3
North Carolina12.715.3
North Dakota57.620.9
Ohio3615.8
Oklahoma37.623.5
Oregon28.221.1
Pennsylvania34.316.3
Rhode Island34.112.6
South Carolina38.317.7
South Dakota44.522.6
Tennessee24.218.2
Texas18.914.5
Utah46.525.2
Vermont48.619.7
Virginia17.415
Washington18.817.6
West Virginia37.121.4
Wisconsin25.816.5
Wyoming3928.8